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Understanding U.S. Domestic Medical Screening for Refugees and Other Newcomers
What will this webinar cover

The domestic medical screening is many newcomers’ first portal of entry into the U.S. healthcare system. For both healthcare providers and refugee service providers, understanding the process and components of the domestic medical screening is essential. This training will provide an overview of the domestic medical screening process, including the components of the screening and recommendations after initial screening. Facilitators will provide a basic overview of physical exam considerations, screening for infectious and non-infectious diseases, and screening for mental health conditions and developmental concerns. They will also describe the purpose of the domestic medical screening and other medical examinations typically received by newcomers, such as the overseas medical examination and the adjustment of status examination. A panel of experts will be available to address questions from participants.

Is this webinar for me?

This training is designed for service providers who help newcomers get connected to the domestic medical screening and help them navigate the U.S. healthcare system. It will be relevant for social workers, case managers, resettlement agency staff, community partners, and others who help support the domestic medical screening and related support processes for newcomers.

Why should I participate?

After participating in this 90-minute session, you will be able to:

- Describe the purpose of the domestic medical screening and other medical examinations typically received by newcomers

- Describe the domestic medical screening process, including initial screening recommendations

- Name key components of the domestic medical screening exam, including physical exam considerations, screening for infectious and non-infectious diseases, and screening for mental health conditions and developmental concerns, based on most recent clinical guidance

Feb 14, 2023 02:00 PM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

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Speakers

Emily Esmaili
Emily Esmaili, MO, MA, is a pediatrician at Lincoln Community Health Center, a federally qualified health center in Durham, North Carolina, that cares for the majority of refugee and immigrant patients in the area. There she serves as clinical lead for refugee and immigrant health and directs a volunteer-run care coordination program in partnership with Duke University and local resettlement agencies. She completed her master's in Global Bioethics and Science Policy as well as a research fellowship in refugee child health at Duke, and she is currently adjunct faculty at the Duke Global Health Institute. She helped write and edit Child Refugee and Migrant Health: A Manual for Health Professionals, among other publications. After residency, she worked for several years as visiting faculty for humanitarian organizations in Laos, Rwanda, and surrounding areas such as the Thai-Burma border.
Marc J. Altshuler
Marc J. Altshuler, MD, is a Professor in Family Medicine, the Residency Program Director for the Department of Family Medicine, and the Founder and Director of the Thomas Jefferson University Center for Refugee and Immigrant Health. In July 2007, the Department of Family and Community Medicine at Jefferson began a relationship with the Nationalities Service Center (NSC) to create a medical home model to achieve equity in healthcare access and health outcomes for refugees resettled in Philadelphia. As the largest single provider for refugees in the city, he also co-founded the Philadelphia Refugee Health Collaborative, which brought together three existing refugee resettlement agencies, along with numerous academic medical centers in Philadelphia.
Jennifer Reed Morillo
Jennifer Reed Morillo has been the North Carolina State Refugee Health Coordinator and has managed the North Carolina Refugee Health Program since 2005. Jennifer’s position involves working closely with relevant federal partners as well as internal state partners, local county public health departments, healthcare providers and administrators, and refugee service providers throughout North Carolina. The main focus of her work is around the coordination of domestic refugee health screening in North Carolina. Refugee health work also includes a broad range of areas, including ongoing health and mental wellness care, health education, training, technical assistance, partnerships, and collaboration.